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Recent Books Published on the Coronado Period (January, 2008)

No Settlement, No Conquest: A History of the Coronado Entrada  

NO SETTLEMENT, NO CONQUEST: A History of the Coronado Entrada.

 

by Richard Flint (University of New Mexico Press, Albuquerque, 2008)

In 2008, Richard Flint published a popular-level account of the expedition, “No Settlement No Conquest: A History of the Coronado Entrada,” a book that bids to replace Herbert Bolton’s volume as the best general account of the expedition.


Voyage Long and Strange  

A VOYAGE LONG AND STRANGE: Rediscovering the New World

by Tony Horowitz (Henry Holt and Co., New York, 2008)

In 2008, also, Pulitzer-prize winning journalist/writer Tony Horwitz dealt with the Coronado expedition as a major section of his book “A Voyage Long and Strange,” which is an account of the explorations in North America before the 1700s, adjusting and correcting some of the mythic tales that most American children learn about the initial European explorations of our continent.


DOCUMENTS OF THE CORONADO EXPEDITION, 1539-1542: “They Were Not Familiar with His Majesty, nor Did They Wish to Be His Subjects”  

DOCUMENTS OF THE CORONADO EXPEDITION, 1539-1542: “They Were Not Familiar with His Majesty, nor Did They Wish to Be His Subjects”
Edited, Translated, and Annotated by Richard Flint and Shirley Cushing Flint,
(Southern Methodist University Press, Dallas, 2005).

Coronado scholars Richard Flint and Shirley Cushing Flint have published their magnum opus, which will be the definitive translation of nearly all the important, known Coronado-era documents.  The Flints  have made numerous “field trips” to archives in Mexico City and Seville, and spend countless hours going through old documents, and are probably the current world authorities on the records associated with that period.  As Donald Chipman says on the back cover, “...the scholarship is impressive and the translations are superb.”   This 746-page volume includes not only translations but transcriptions of the original Spanish, along with nearly 100 pages of notes on various points.   It is pricey but will be the book that everyone in this business uses over the next decade or so. 


FRANCISCO VASQUEZ DE CORONADO: Famous Journeys to the American Southwest and Colonial New Mexico
by Lesli J. Favor (Rosen Publishing Group, New York, 2003).

This is a handsome book aimed at school readers, perhaps ages 10 to highschool, depending on education level. It has fairly large type and many dramatic and well-reproduced pictures, some of which are not commonly used. It summarizes the world of Coronado and his expedition. It is up to date and includes a photo of one of the copper crossbow bolt heads from Blanco Canyon, Texas.


THE CORONADO EXPEDITION FROM THE DISTANCE OF 450 YEARS   THE CORONADO EXPEDITION FROM THE DISTANCE OF 450 YEARS
Ed. by Richard and Shirley Flint. (University of New Mexico Press, Albuquerque, 2003)

This is a volume of papers from the April 2002 conference at New Mexico Highlands University and Floydada Texas. It contains many survey articles of lasting value, an update of work on the Blanco Canyon Coronado army campsite, and an excellent snapshot of ongoing research as of 2002. 


CITIES OF GOLD: A Novel of the Ancient and Modern Southwest (fiction)   CITIES OF GOLD: A Novel of the Ancient and Modern Southwest (fiction)
by William K. Hartmann (Forge - Tom Doherty Associates, New York, 2002).

This combines a modern story set in Arizona (protagonist working for developer, researching the Coronado route), with a parallel story in alternate chapters set in the Coronado period (focusing on the mystery of Marcos de Niza and his discovery of Cibola). Themes involve the transformation of land from resource to commodity, the roots of the American Conquistador mentality, and the age-old American dream of getting rich quick. A review by SW writer Craig Childs in High Country News says "To understand the formation of the modern West -- the formation in fact of history -- read this book."

Signed copies can be ordered from the organizer of this web site -- contact hartmann [at] psi.edu


GREAT CRUELTIES HAVE BEEN REPORTED: The 1544 Investigation of the Coronado Expedition  

GREAT CRUELTIES HAVE BEEN REPORTED: The 1544 Investigation of the Coronado Expedition
by Richard Flint (Southern Methodist University Press, Dallas, 2002).

This is an annotated presentation (in English and Spanish) of the testimony taken during the 1544 inquiry into the conduct of the expedition. It has many insights into the expedition, as well as being a mirror to our modern attitudes about interacting with other parts of the world. As remarked by David J. Weber on the back cover, this is "an enduring contribution to the historiography of the Southwest."


WE CAME NAKED AND BAREFOOT: The Journey of Cabeza de Vaca Across North America  

WE CAME NAKED AND BAREFOOT: The Journey of Cabeza de Vaca Across North America

by Alex D. Krieger (University of Texas Press, Austin, 2002).

A good analytical volume about the route of the Cabeza de Vaca party.  Alex Krieger died in 1991 but his wife has assembled his analysis of the route, together with his translations of both Cabeza de Vaca’s account, and the Olviedo account that was prepared from the early report of all three Spanish survivors, soon after they arrived in Mexico.  Many of Krieger’s identifications of sites (such as Corazones) are now questioned, but the book has many valuable observations and notes about geographic and historical aspects of the route. 


THE CORONADO EXPEDITION TO TIERRA NUEVA: The 1540-1542 Route Across the Southwest  

THE CORONADO EXPEDITION TO TIERRA NUEVA: The 1540-1542 Route Across the Southwest

Edited by Richard and Shirley Flint Intro. by Carroll L. Riley. (University Press of Colorado, Boulder, 1997)

A pivotal compendium of papers stemming from the first Coronado research conference organized by the Flints in 1992. It contains articles on various parts of the route, reports on artifactual material, Marcos de Niza, the Chichilticale problem, etc.


CITIES OF GOLD (non-fiction)  

CITIES OF GOLD (non-fiction)

by Douglas Preston (University of New Mexico Press, Albuquerque, 1993)

This book tells of Preston's 1,000 mile journey retracing on horseback part of Coronado's 1540-42 expedition. The book is available in a number of local bookstores in New Mexico, as well as from Amazon.com and from UNM press directly.


Last updated

August 13, 2008

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